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| our journey away from land of gender binary |

"As a trans woman, not many things give me a headache the way the entire concept of passing does. Passing is the idea that if a trans woman (or any person who is presenting as a woman) looks, dresses and acts a certain way, people won’t be able to tell they are anything other than a completely “normal” woman. If you look at online trans communities or forums, you’ll find tons of tips on how to pass better – everything from hair removal tips to workouts to how to walk and sit more femininely.
All of this presupposes that there is only one right way to look like and be a woman. And it’s infuriating. On the one hand, whenever I go out in public or post pictures online, a part of me is deathly afraid that I’ll be insulted or worse. I desperately want to be accepted as the woman I am. On the other hand, I hate that in order to feel safe, I’m expected to fit into the very narrow box that is labeled “woman.” Tips on how to pass always seem to say that you should avoid building muscle mass and avoid wearing clothes and makeup that are too costumey, that you should try to hide your shoulders and soften your features. Trans women are often told that if we want to pass, we have to try our hardest to be petite, soft, have just the right amount of femininity, and not stand out too much. But what if I want to be a different kind of woman? What if I want to look like Grace Jones or Kate Moennig? What if I want to look like Beth Ditto or Dolly Parton? They’re all cis women; don’t they pass?"

Meyllen Djneres (via muffinsandcouture)

The moral of “passing” discussions always seems to be:

If you get bashed it will be your fault.

(via charthebutcher)


Do you even know how badly I’ve been needing to hear exactly these words for the past few months now?

(via sixtyforty)

*slow clap——> standing ovation* yes! Yes yes!

(via boyqueen)

omg when i started transitioning Kate Moennig was legit my goal

(via dizzzyrichardpig)

i just need this on my blog again

(via boyqueen)

(Source: joancarolclayton, via transawareness)

— 1 year ago with 8599 notes

Hi everyone! Life has been hella busy for Girlfriend and I these past few months, but here are a few updates:

Girlfriend’s updates:

  • Still very much in the closet, BUT
  • Came out as transgender to her sister, mother, and several closest friends in these past few months. Everyone but her mom was very supportive (perhaps I’ll post more about this later).
  • Just graduated with a bachelor’s degree and got a new job!
  • Is putting off transitioning for a while, but hoping to go out with me to a few queer night events around town dressed more femininely than her everyday attire.

My updates:

  • Got a new job, myself.
  • Came out as queer to MY mom (who was far more supportive than I really could’ve foreseen), and a lot more of my friends.

OUR updates:

  • Our relationship is somewhat “open” now; we’re very honest about we do and want to do with other people, and so far it’s going just fine. 
  • We’re looking to move in together within the next year, which is exciting!

That’s all for nowww, but please send me an ask if you want  to see any kind of specific content moving forward, or if you have a question for either of us!

— 1 year ago with 4 notes
#trans* partner  #trans* girlfriend  #trans* lover 
queerability:

As many as one in five transgender people need or are at risk of needing homeless assistance, but in most shelters youth are housed by sex assigned at birth rather than by gender identity.
From Fenway Health

queerability:

As many as one in five transgender people need or are at risk of needing homeless assistance, but in most shelters youth are housed by sex assigned at birth rather than by gender identity.

From Fenway Health

(via loversintransition-deactivated2)

— 1 year ago with 74 notes
dissimilarto:

jakigriot:

Reblog Fo’ Life.

“Yay you’ve won our grand prize!”

dissimilarto:

jakigriot:

Reblog Fo’ Life.

“Yay you’ve won our grand prize!

(via loversintransition-deactivated2)

— 1 year ago with 7770 notes
Five Ways Cis Feminists Can Help Build Trans Inclusivity And Intersectionality →

1) Be willing to confront instances of transphobia, cissexism, cisnormativity, cis-centrism, cis privilege and other forms of destructive bias where you find them (especially when you find them within feminist, activist or queer spaces), not through “call outs” or other toxic, self-defeating or abusive strategies, but by taking the opportunity for genuine discourse.

2) Don’t take a purely passive, reactive approach. Rather than waiting for things like someone saying something overtly cissexist, or a trans person bringing up a particular concern, be willing to proactively introduce trans issues, or trans-relevant aspects of broader issues, to feminist discourse. Likewise, proactively treat possible consequences, perspectives and concerns relevant to trans people and trans experiences as being not only significant but essential to all feminist issues and conversations.

3) Don’t assume any given issue is strictly, or even primarily, relevant to cis women. All feminist concerns are also transgender concerns, and vice versa. There are no feminist dialogues in which trans voices “don’t belong”, or to which trans voices have “nothing to add”. There are nosocial issues related to gender that don’t have consequences for trans people.

4) Proactively seek out transgender voices, perspectives and input on all issues, not simply what you regard as “trans issues” or situations where the value of such perspectives is immediately obvious to you. Come to us, rather than waiting for us to come to you.

5) Don’t treat the larger social conflict of gender as being dialectic or binary in nature. Don’t assume a unidirectional model of gender-based oppression.

(Source: loveyourrebellion, via loversintransition-deactivated2)

— 1 year ago with 4424 notes
#gender  #feminism  #transgender  #intersectionality  #trans  #cis  #cissexism  #transphobia 
Ariz. colleges shake up gender roles for homecoming →

 Friday will mark the first time that the Sun Devils’ homecoming committee will not crown a king or a queen. Students have changed the title of the homecoming court to “homecoming royalty.” 

“We wanted to get rid of that gender bias and be open to include all ASU students regardless of what (sexual identity) they affiliate with or what their gender is,” 

(Source: neutrois, via loversintransition-deactivated2)

— 1 year ago with 75 notes
camdynthegreat:

ryansallans:

To find more information about the health disparities and discrimination that affect trans-identified individuals in the U.S. visit the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force and National Center for Transgender Equality’s 2011 report by clicking here. 

Okay these are great facts. ERROR: This is not homophobia. Discrimination against trans* people is not homophobia. Stop. Transphobia. Quit erasing people.

camdynthegreat:

ryansallans:

To find more information about the health disparities and discrimination that affect trans-identified individuals in the U.S. visit the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force and National Center for Transgender Equality’s 2011 report by clicking here

Okay these are great facts. ERROR: This is not homophobia. Discrimination against trans* people is not homophobia. Stop. Transphobia. Quit erasing people.

(via partnersofmtf)

— 1 year ago with 806 notes